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Big Businesses Thrive, Small Ones Struggle, Officials Say

Economy, however, believed to be on the upswing in Bridgewater.

With the start of the new year, large businesses around Bridgewater are continuing to thrive while smaller ones are encountering some limitations, according to Howard Turbowitz, township economic development officer.

“The business environment for large companies is thriving as we continue to emerge from the long protracted recession,” he said. “Small businesses, such as the ones in the Martinsville area, still have challenges with the economy, the limited traffic to their neighborhoods and competition from other like companies and businesses.”

But, Turbowitz said, that does not mean there are not organizations ready to help.

The Somerset County Business Partnership, Turbowitz said, works with small businesses throughout the area, and the newly created Washington Valley Business Alliance has been formed to aid small businesses and help them grow, particularly in Martinsville.

But despite trying times for smaller corporations, Turbowitz said, there are several businesses and companies opening throughout Bridgewater in the coming months.

First, Turbowitz said, the Somerset Valley Rehab & Nursing is expected to complete its 50,000-square-foot addition to its Route 22 West facility, and Gen III Fox Chase is expected to complete construction of its retail complex on Route 22 East at Milltown Road.

At the Somerset Shopping Center, Turbowitz said, New York & Co. will be taking over the FYE store there.

And the former I-Hop on Route 202 North near Milltown Road will be replaced by the Gallup Chinese Bistro, which is currently under construction.

Turbowitz said there are a few open retail spaces available around town, in addition to a few industrial spaces.

“The specifics of all these commercial vacancies is best delineated by the many commercial real estate firms represented in the area,” he said.

Any businesses that want to open Bridgewater, Turbowitz said, can take advantage of working with the zoning office, code official and others to provide guidance.

“The commercial sector continues to evolve in Bridgewater,” Turbowitz said. “The township has diversified office space available at a variety of sizes and costs, which are constantly changing.”

Robert Young January 17, 2013 at 01:24 PM
How about this, come this Saturday we all go to a small business here in Bridgewater and buy one item to lend a helping hand to our small shop owners. It is going to get worse for them as the Obama administration takes down the American economy. Small business will be crippled in the next six months and will not survive. Also, try and buy american as the choices are there. We just build a new house and I made sure 90% of the materials were made in America and some here in New Jersey. Check the lables before you buy.
Stephanie Wilkins January 17, 2013 at 02:26 PM
Hey Robert I was all with you until you had to trash our President...I totally disagree with you. I am a thriving small business owner.
Gary January 17, 2013 at 03:22 PM
Buy your pizza from a local pizzaria, not only are they more likely to insure their employees it keeps revenue in the local area. Leverage local contractors for minor home improvements if you can; centralized de-humidifiers are an easy way to help reduce interior mold and a relatively simple job for a know contractor. In need of a water heater, local contractor not only can get you the heater at a discount but doesn't charge additional overhead as is done by national chains. And, as Robert indicates (political garbage notwithstanding) as to buy Made in USA while apparel and car parts are a challenge, things like appliances are increasing in their availability. Consider moving partially off the grid, solar installation is/has become fairly affordable; renewable tax credits, made in USA product set, and local employment all generate revenue and tax base. Finally, consider residential, non-interuptable, natural gas generator; most of the generators are made in USA provide transfer switching ability upon detection of power loss, can essentially power sump start up (peak draw), refrigeration, cable power, and limited light in the event of power loss. While no tax credit is available it will make your house more attractive in the resell market and you will be able to recover most of the investment on resell.
Robert Young January 17, 2013 at 05:00 PM
Stephanie, I am so happy that your business is doing well. What kind of business do you own. On the other issue I am so happy you disagreed with me as that is the America I have known after 63 years of being born here in the United States. But being a true American I personnally am sick of seeing my country go down the tubes do to a socialist with and agenda to hurt our way of life. I would be glad to visit your business if you would like to post its name.
elizabeth January 20, 2013 at 01:27 PM
Can folks here list their favorite small, locally owned businesses, to help us all locate the places we want to support? Thanks!
Robert Young January 22, 2013 at 04:00 PM
Stephanie, where is your thriving business or don't you need us. I still would like to come and see what you do that is thriving in this great Part Time worker enviornment. mr.young
Robert Young January 23, 2013 at 02:06 PM
THIS WOMEN (STEPHANIE) SAID HER BUSINESS WAS THRIVING SO WHY HAS SHE NOT LISTED IT AS I ASKED HER TO DO??????????????????

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